Birth Control for Mothers

Updated: Mar 20

Birth control is an important part of every woman's life in order to avoid pregnancy, plan for it or stop experiencing severe menstrual cramps. Birth control options are vast and they depend on the unique personal preferences of each woman. Birth control is especially important for mothers who have recently given birth or breastfeeding mothers. Mothers who have just given birth may want to avoid the hormonal changes that come with pregnancy, while breastfeeding mothers need to avoid hormones so their milk production does not get affected. Birth control options for both groups are available and they vary according to how they work, when you can start using them and how long you need to use them before your cycle stabilizes.


Birth control pills are oral contraceptives that come in a pack of 28 pills. There are two types of birth control pills: combination and progestin-only. Birth control pills are completely safe for women who have recently given birth and are breastfeeding as long as they consider the right options and consult a doctor before making any decisions. Birth control pills work by preventing ovulation, so there is no egg to fertilize. Birth control pills also thicken the cervical mucus so the sperm cannot reach the uterus and they thin the uterine lining, making it harder for a fertilized egg to implant itself.


Birth Control for Mothers of Newborns

If you have recently given birth and are looking for a birth control option that is safe for you and your newborn, you may want to consider using a progestin-only pill. Progestin-only pills are Birth Control pills that only contain the hormone progestin. Progestin-only pills come in two forms: the mini pill and the implant. The mini pill must be taken at the same time every day in order to be effective and it can be used up to three hours late without losing its effectiveness. The implant is a small, thin rod that is inserted under the skin of your upper arm. It releases progestin into your body over a three-year period. Birth control pills that contain both estrogen and progestin are not safe for breastfeeding mothers.

Birth Control for Breastfeeding Mothers

If you are a breastfeeding mother and looking for a birth control option that does not contain hormones, you may want to consider using the copper IUD. The copper IUD is a small, T-shaped device that is inserted into your uterus by a doctor. It contains no hormones and can be left in place for up to 10 years. The copper IUD can also be used as emergency contraception if it is inserted within five days after unprotected sex. Other non-hormonal birth control options for breastfeeding mothers include condoms and the diaphragm. Condoms are effective at preventing pregnancy when used correctly and they also protect against sexually transmitted infections. The diaphragm is a shallow, dome-shaped cup that is inserted into the vagina to cover the cervix and prevent sperm from entering. Birth control options for breastfeeding mothers are only effective if they don't contain estrogen.

Birth Control Options for Newly Postpartum Mothers

If you have recently given birth and want a hormonal option for birth control, you may want to consider using Birth Control Pills or Contraceptive Injections. Birth control pills work by preventing ovulation so there is no egg to fertilize. Birth control pills also thicken cervical mucus so the sperm cannot reach the uterus and thin out the uterine lining, making it harder for a fertilized egg to implant itself.

Birth Control Options for Mothers with Migraines

Some Birth Control Pills are also used to treat women who suffer from migraines. Birth control pills may help prevent or reduce the severity of migraines for some women, so talk to your doctor about whether this is an option for you. Birth control options that may be beneficial for women with migraines include:


- Birth Control Pills containing estrogen and a derivative of progesterone called drospirenone

- Birth Control Patch containing estrogen and a derivative of progesterone called norelgestromin

- Birth Control Ring containing estrogen and a derivative of progesterone called etonogestrel

In conclusion, there are many different Birth Control options available for mothers who have recently given birth. Talk to your doctor to find the option that is best for you. Birth control pills that contain hormones may not be safe for breastfeeding mothers, but there are many other options available, including the copper IUD, condoms and the diaphragm. If you are a mother with migraines, talk to your doctor about whether Birth Control Pills containing estrogen and drospirenone, norelgestromin, or etonogestrel may help prevent or reduce the severity of your migraines.

 

This blog pro­vides infor­ma­tion about telemed­i­cine, health and related sub­jects. The blog content and any linked materials herein are not intended to be, and should not be con­strued as a substitute for, med­ical or healthcare advice, diagnosis or treatment. Any reader or per­son with a med­ical con­cern should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed physi­cian or other healthcare provider. This blog is provided purely for informational purposes. The views expressed herein are not sponsored by and do not represent the opinions of nōni.

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